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. the u.s. trade gap narrows as the world buys more made in america products and the u.s. buys less foreign oil. >> susie: and with gas prices rising, chevy hopes its new diesel chevy cruze will attract buyers looking for more miles per gallon. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r." >> susie: millions of people are bracing tonight for a powerful snow storm that could cripple the east coast. some forecasters say this could be the blizzard of the century with record amounts of snow and extremely strong winds. in parts of the northeast, transportation was shut down. the governors of massachusetts and connecticut declared a state of emergency and banned car travel, train service and cancelled flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making preparations today. erika miller reports. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also b
." >> this is "bbc world news america." on the floor of the u.s. senate, protesters delay the confirmation hearing for america's next spy chief. teargas and riot police on the streets of tunis as the country's fledgling democracy struggles to survive a crisis we know it is not good for us but it is not fun, but why are so many people doing it? fledglingntry's democracy struggles to survive. we know that it is not good for us, but wire so many people doing it? welcome to our viewers on public television in america. america's drone program came -- undere nomination fire at the nomination hearing for john brennan. the man that president obama has tapped to be his next spy chief says that the white house goes through agony to make sure that there are no collateral deaths in these attacks. >> a panel of senators brimming with questions. barely a few words in, the first interruption but not from politicians. >> i am honored to appear before you today as the president's nominee. >> would you hold please? i will ask the police to please remove this woman. >> four times, protesters interrupted at the heari
of last year, there are fresh worries about the state of the u.s. economy and profits for this year. on top of that, financial conditions in the eurozone are still a threat to u.s. stocks. >> with the market at current levels, which... basically looks like they're priced for perfection, there doesn't leave a lot of room for any disappointing news. and there are a lot of areas that could create disappointing news. >> reporter: weissberg says many market pros believe stocks are headed higher, but they need a catalyst, and that's unlikely to come from tonight's state of the union. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> susie: still ahead, why ailing smartphone maker blackberry is hoping the sports market will help it on its road to recovery. we'll explain in tonight's "beyond the scoreboard." a "silly sideshow--" that's what apple c.e.o. tim cook called a recent lawsuit filed by hedge fund manager david einhorn. speaking at a goldman sachs technology conference today, cook also said apple is considering einhorn's proposal to issue preferred stock and return more money to shareholders. e
. the u.s. airways/american airlines merger is ready for take-off, and the companies say they see no turbulence ahead from washington regulators. and senate democrats offer their plan to head off the sequester's sharp spending cuts. we get the details from michigan senator debbie stabenow. we have that and more tonight on "n.b.r." two big sweetheart deals on this valentine's day: american airlines is merging with u.s. airways, creating the world's largest airline company; and warren buffett is buying h.j. heinz, the biggest food company acquisition ever. we'll have more on american in a moment, but we begin tonight with buffett and that surprising mega-food deal. the billionaire investor is teaming up with the billionaire owners of 3g capital to buy the ketchup maker for $28 billion. the private equity group and buffett's berkshire hathaway are paying $72.50 a share in cash. that's a 20% premium over heinz's closing price yesterday. ruben ramirez reports. >> reporter: the oracle of omaha now has a new title: ketchup king. for the first time, warren buffett, who's shied away from w
in commodities. >> susie: and u.s. companies and infrastructure are increasing under the threat of cyber attack. we look at a new plan tying safeguards to trade policy. >> tom: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! >> susie: on the comeback trail, hewlett packard posting better than expected first quarter results tonight, as a wide- ranging revamp of the struggling computer maker takes hold. and its shares take flight, rising over 6% in after hours trading. h.p. earned $0.82 a share, $0.11 better than wall street had anticipated. and revenues, while down at $28.4 billion, also beat the street. c.e.o. meg whitman has been on the job 17 months, speaking with investors today, whitman said she felt good about the rest of the year, and that last year's hard work was paying off for h.p. but, analysts say h.p. is not out of the woods yet. >> it's the type of thing that can be fixed quickly. this isn't going to take several years to play out so first of all it seems like meck whitman's vision is very much on track but we're not seeing that play out in the financials, but it is encouraging that guidance wa
. that and more tonight on "n.b.r." investors spent much of this week focused on the u.s. market with major market indexes hitting five-year highs. but now the spotlight is shifting overseas. g-20 finance ministers and central bankers are meeting in moscow over the weekend. they will be debating the need for austerity, versus the need to spur growth. no one expects a quick turnaround for the european economy, which has been mired in recession. but as erika miller reports, that may make now a good time to invest. >> reporter: it would makes sense that american investors would be loading up on u.s. stocks with the market here doing so well. but they're not. last week, investors in stock mutual funds put virtually all their cash in international markets. more than $3 billion went into funds holding international stocks. by comparison, mutual funds holding u.s. stocks suffered their first outflows of the year. investment advisors say small investors may be on to something. >> international investing has had a bad reputation over the last couple of years had a bad experience, people have taken money ou
-qaeda rebels that the u.s. doesn't support. i don't want to see them at the top of the heap. >> rose: that's always the answer to the question people always ask. suppose you win what then. >> it's a good question. right now they're not winning. right now you have a situation where assad is pretty entrenched and the rebels are making gammons -- games but they don't seem to be decisive yet. >> rose: able to close the deal. >> not yet. so you're looking at a fairly drawn out conflict. one of the concerns people have is if the conflict is drawn out much longer, there won't be much left to hand over to oppose the assad regime. the whole mechanism and institutions of the state will have been destroyed. >> rose: let me make sure i understand. i have your piece in front of me and i read it several times. you are reporting from people within the whitehouse they're beginning to consider as a condition deteriorates reopening that debate. is that the extent of what you're saying. >> the way i would put it is they haven't ruled it out and down the road they may reconsider it. and really the emphasis
that includes a billionaire warren buffet. the deal is believed to be the largest in the food industry. u.s. airways and american airlines have announced they are joining forces. the merger creates the world's biggest airline in terms of miles flown by passengers around the world. we have this from new york. >> the courtship is over and now they are making it permanent. u.s. airways announced its merger with american airlines. [applause] it was the closest thing to a marriage ceremony. the u.s. airways to executive counted the benefits of this union. >> these are two highly complementary airlines. the 900 route we fly individually. when you add them up, there are only 12 of them that have overlap. this is really about providing better service to customers. it creates a nice third competitor to the two larger airlines. our view is it increases competition, doesn't decrease competition. >> the deal will save the combines company's $11 billion per year. united shareholders will own 28% of the stock while american shareholders will own the remaining 72%. this deal will help rescue it from bankr
to taking an action that's going to mitigate that threat. gwen: when is it ok to use u.s. drones to kill americans? and when does congress get to know about it? >> if the executive branch makes a mistake and kills the wrong person or a group of the wrong people, how should the government acknowledge that? gwen: closer to home, did the folks who issue credit ratings make the mortgage crisis worse? the justice department says yes. >> we believe that s&p played a significant role in helping to bring our economy to the brink of collapse. gwen: and on politics, republicans and democrats map out the future. >> it's important not to read too much into any particular political victory, because this country is big, it is diverse, it is contentious, and we don't have a monopoly on wisdom. >> to uphold this legacy of those who have come before us, washington will need to make some choices. and in a divided government, these choices are often tough. gwen: covering the week, carrie johnson of nph, pete williams of nbc news, alexis simendinger of real clear politics, and beth reinhard of "national jou
angeles police office wanted for murder. >> suarez: we turn to iran as the u.s. tightens sanctions but tehran shows no signs of halting its nuclear program or engaging in talks. >> brown: from our american graduate series, we have the story of a chicago non-profit that aims to change the lives of would-be dropouts. >> what's interesting about one goal is that it pinpoints and targets low-income, underperforming students in non- selective chicago public schools, students who are least likely to graduate from high school, let alone college. >> suarez: we look at newly released documents showing leaders in the catholic church in los angeles shielded pedophile priests and failed to report allegations of child abuse. >> brown: and gwen ifill talks with biographer jeanne theo- haris, who offers a complex ait of the woman best known for refusing to give up her seat on an alabama bus in 1955. >> she is celebrated for one act and i think part of that celebration puts it all in the past, right, when the actual rosa parks keeps working on racial and social justice issues all the way up to the
, and investors are seeing in the u.s. economy. we preview the economic state of the union. why regulators need to treat them like other business. then u.s. airways sees big benefits in merging with american airlines. we look at the new landscape for airlines if the deal goes through. we have that anmore tonight on nbr. president obama is preparing to deliver his first state of the union address of his new term, tomorrow. the american people will be listening carefully to his plans to grow the economy, especially as they struggle with less take home pay, and worries about their jobs. while there are signs of improvement in the economy, the unemployment rate rose in january to 7.9%. so what is the current state of the economy? erika miller talked to two experts with different views. >> reporter: it may seem strange to many investors that the stock market can be hovering at five- year highs, when the economy is so weak. but what's fueling the rally is not the current situation, it's hope. >> we've taken out some of the downside tail risks. so, we're feeling like although it's not going to be a bo
by groups opposed to economic reform, on top of that, u.s. equities face a looming friday deadline for massive government budget cuts, known as "sequestration." the dow tumbled 216 points, the nasdaq fell nearly 46, and the s&p 500 lost 28 points. while there's been much talk of a correction in the stock market, sequestration may not be the catalyst. suzanne pratt reports. >> reporter: it is widely accepted on wall street that sequestration is coming. and, with it a new reason for the fragile u.s. economy to sputter. but, what will the first phase of billions of dollars in federal spending cuts actually do to the u.s. stock market? after all, major market averages are hovering close to all-time highs, and don't forget investors are finally warming up to equities again. floor broker art cashin says today's selling was mostly a reaction to italy's election, and that the stock market is not yet focused on sequestration. >> i don't think that even we slip into sequestration it will have the same dramatic effect that the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling had. it is seen as somewhat temp
of the chinese military cyber-attacks against the u.s.? we will show you what we found. today it was her comments about the duchess of cambridge that caused a firestorm. >> she is roughly four months pregnant. there is evidence of a rather more rounded stomach than before. the pregnancy sickness of early december has passed gadd kathrin is still taking things carefully. last week she and william were on holiday. she was fulfilling her first public engagement for some weeks, visiting a center in south london that helps women recover from drug and alcohol dependency. she has become the focus of unflattering comments by hilary mantell. she described how the media has portrayed kate middleton transition to a fashionable world catches. >> i saw kate becoming a jointed doll on which certain thinigs ngs are hung. she has no personality of her own. entirely defined by what she wore. >> she said the person who emerged from the transition seems machine made. catherine was defended by the chief executive of the charity which she visited today and of which she is a patron. >> all i can speak of is what i now
a marriage of sorts, on this valentine's day. their combination means the field of major u.s. carriers will shrink by one. these jetliners-- sporting shiny new paint jobs-- are among the roughly 900 planes in the american airlines fleet and they're about to be joined by the 622 planes currently flying for u.s. airways. the price tag for the deal: $11 billion. creditors of american's bankrupt parent company a.m.r. will own 72% of the combined airline. the merger affects some 187 million passengers who fly the two airlines annually. >> i grew up on u.s. airways. >> brown: as well as more than 100,000 employees. >> our best goal going forward is to make it the biggest, strongest airline in the country, and i suppose that's about to happen. >> brown: the combined company will keep the american name and headquarters in fort worth, texas. but it is u.s. airways c.e.o. doug parker who will run it. his counterpart-- tom horton at american-- will serve as chairman, but bow out after the transition the two are friends who started their careers together at american three decades ago. >> to run a
together. >> do you expect his successor to have a change relative to the u.s.? >> there are going to be some challenges -- channels of communications. i do not expect best friends between america and united states but i expect the town to get better. it is in a terrible state. they have the highest inflation in latin america. they have food court -- of food shortages all over the place. that is why hugo chavez has come back to calm things down. they are in for a rough time. >> any guess on who the successor might be? >> his current vice-president is in the best position. hugo chavez designated him in december. he does not have his charisma, but he is in the strongest position right now. >> in other news, a former u.s. prosecutor house called for the international court to investigate war crimes in syria. he is working on an inquiry into the syrian conflict, reporting on human-rights violations of both sides. including the use of mass executions and the imprisonment of children. evidence has gathered more than 500 syrian refugees. people have been reported to be wounded in a clash
. one more item from the world of sports but the u.s. government has joined a lawsuit against lance armstrong after talks with his lawyers broke down. the suit argues armstrong defrauded the american public by insisting he was not using drugs will writing for the u.s. postal service team. last month, he admitted using performance enhancing drugs. this weekend, italian voters must decide do they trust to get their ailing country moving again. the choice includes a former communist an outspoken comedian, berlusconi, and economic technocrat mario monti. our europe editor has more. naples in the final hours of campaigning in the italian general election but europe fears the result could cause tremors any euro zone. an ex-orites to win is communist. away from the public rallies, he had this message for europe. >> i intend to convince your of the that austerity is not enough. i do not believe european policies are correct. they need to be adjusted to take more account of investment and jobs. >> he promises to reduce the deficit any sense the mood in italy is disillusioned and angry. canch
numbers are a positive sign for the u.s. economy. investors were worried about some not so good signals today about europe's economy. stocks turned negative on comments from europe's central bank president saying the strong euro could dampen europe's recovery. here on wall street, the dow fell 42 points, the nasdaq lost three and the s&p slipped over two points. >> tom: still ahead, douglas burtnick joins us, he's with aberdeen asset management. >> susie: a battle is brewing between a big name hedge fund investor and apple. at issue: how to get apple to unlock value for shareholders. today david einhorn of greenlight capital sued apple to block a move that would stop the use of preferred shares. shareholders will vote on this at apple's annual meeting on february 27. what einhorn is proposing is that apple pay out more of its cash hoard to investors, using a special kind of preferred stock. einhorn has a lot at stake: his fund owns more than one million shares of apple, and while the stock rose a bit today, it's down 35% since its peak of $700 last september. late today apple issued thi
and untapped the nation's worst oil spill. on monday in new orleans, the civil trial pitting the u.s. government and gulf coast states against b.p. is due to begin. ruben ramirez has a preview of the case and the possibility of a last minute deal. >> reporter: nearly three years after a rig explosion killed 11 people and spilled four million barrels of oil into the gulf of mexico the u.s. government and b.p. are set to square off in a louisiana courtroom. b.p. has a history of settling civil cases before or during trial, so an eleventh hour deal could still be reached. the justice department and gulf states are considering offering b.p. a $16 billion deal, that's nearly three times what b.p. had hoped to pay. for it's part, b.p. says: >> we have always been open to settlements on reasonable terms, faced with demands that are excessive and not based on reality or the merits of the case, we are going to trial. >> reporter: if there is no settlement over the weekend, well owner b.p. will be joined by rig owner transocean and halliburton, the cement services provider on the well. on the
criticize other countries? the u.s. doesn't admit to owning cyber weapons either just as the chinese don't. it makes it very hard to put together rules about how you would use cyber or not if nobody will admit to have the weapon. at least in the nuclear age we knew who had the weapon. we did, the soviets did. in this case, the american position is that the u.s. never uses any weapon that it has to support individual american corporations and yet the chinese for most of the hacking we've seen, not all but most seem to be going in to get trade secrets, industrial secrets, processes, things that would enable them to keep trying to grow at 6% or 7%. the u.s. uses its cyber tools the way it did in iran which is to mess up the iranian enrichment of uranium, sort of another way of doing ordinary covert action. >> so is the goal of what the chinese seem to be doing to under aspects of the u.s. economy for competitive reasons as opposed to affirmatively trying to harm u.s. corporations, take down their operations which one might interpret as an act of economic warfare? >> no one as yet seen a cas
assault in the u.s. military. >> 86% of men and women who are sexually assaulted in the military don't report. they experience reprisals that are, in many ways, a second betrayal that's even worse than the actual rape itself. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. after aurora, after virginia tech, after columbine, the question of gun violence becomes a recurring national conversation. this evening, newshour joins pbs in a week of special coverage on the topic of gun violence: "after newtown." the waves of reaction since december's connecticut school shooting continue to
followed north korea's launch of a satellite in december. the u.s. and others had warned that the rocket could also be used to carry nuclear weapons. today's nuclear test se the u.n. security council back into emergency meetings to discuss yet more sanctions. u.s. ambassador susan rice. >> the actions of north korea are a threat to regional peace and security, international peace and security. they are not acceptable. they will not be tolerated. and they will be met with north korea's increasing isolation and pressure under united states sanctions. >> brown: in washington a state department official confirmed that pong jiang had informed the u.s. of its intention to test a nuclear device but had given no date. other nations joined in a wave of condemnation including the russian foreign minister who was in south africa. >> from what we have heard today, pyongyang violated its commitment and deserves condemnation because it ignored the norms of international laws. >> brown: even china, the north's lone major ally voiced its, quote, staunch opposition. it urged north korea to return to its
concerns at the u.s.-japan summit; a public health crisis linked to gun violence; shields and brooks and violence against women in south africa. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: a winter storm headed east today, after socking the plains with snow, sleet and freezing rain. it was already blamed for four deaths, flight disruptions and hundreds of road accidents. the huge system was moving north and east, and losing some of its punch. but it was still expected to make trouble in the northeast and new england this weekend. the sounds of snowblowers roaring to life and shovels scraping the driveway could be heard in state after state today. much of the nation's mid-section spent the day digging out from more than a foot of snow and for drivers, it quickly turned into an icy nightmare. the highly unsettled storm also brought lightning and thunder, but it was the snow falling at two inches an hour in places that caused the worst problems. kansas city mayor sly james said it was the pace that was hard to deal with. >> it fell fast, it fell heavy
of troops stationed in south korea. the u.s. and allies may respond by putting their forces on higher alert and building new missile defenses. that will make for more attention and instability in asia. kim jong-un has his finger on the nuclear trigger. he may find himself more isolated and threatened, not more secure. he's already warning that any new sanctions may lead to new nuclear tests. the bbc news, seoul. >> more threatened. that is a worrying prospect. i am joined by the senior adviser for east asia policy at the u.s. defense department. thank you for coming in. what do we know about this latest test? >> the details are still coming in. we think it was more powerful and relatively successful than previous tests in 2006-2009. we're still trying to figure out whether it was using plutonium or highly enriched uranium. >> what is the significant? >> highly enriched uranium would be new. they have limited stockpiles of plutonium carried they would use that up in their testing process. >> we have the united nations saying this is a threat to international security. how much is that true?
than one hundred u.s. corporations and organizations. good evening. i'm judy woodruff. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, we assess the damage done by the cyber attacks, and explore the motivations behind what appear to be china's systematic targeting of foreign firms and governments. >> woodruff: then, we turn to today's arguments at the supreme court over a patent case with implications for biotechnology giant monsanto, and a range of fields from medical research to computer software. >> ifill: we continue our weeklong focus on guns, "after newtown." tonight jeffrey brown reports on the possible links, if any, between violent video games and violent behavior. >> the result clearly shows that playing a violent video game increases aggressive behavior. >> one of the problems in this field is that people confuse aggression and violence. >> woodruff: and margaret warner gets an update on the oscar pistorius murder trial in south africa, as the prosecution and the defense lay out conflicting accounts of the events leading to his girlfriend's death. that's all ahead on
, measure what that means for us. what does that mean? >> i think the good news here is that the u.s. economy is actually growing at probably about a 2% rate. so if the full sequester goes in and stays in place for the full year between now and the end of the year, then it's essentially what mr. bernanke is saying growth will be 1.5% instead of 2%. i doubt very much that's the way it's going to pan out. eventually some kind of compromise will be worked out. but again the good news is that the u.s. consumers, u.s. businesses, are beginning to spend, are beginning to hire in the case of businesses, and that momentum seems to actually be picking up a little bit. so even in the worst case scenario we're not talking a recession. we're talking slower growth which isn't good... >> ifill: not good at a time when you're recovering. so when people look at this debate that's going on now, how do we look at it? do we look at it long-term, short term? do we look at the reality or the possibility? what is the greatest, most damaging part of this? >> well, i think the damaging part of it is, you kn
alone. people feel oppressed by a regime that will quite literally stop at nothing. >> the u.s. defense secretary wanted to arm the syrian rebels, but the white house did not want to. do you think there is a chance the white house might change its mind? >> i think it is inevitable with the change of team, particularly yith secretary of state carrkerr coming in, but there has to be a complete revamping of strategy. that may be a decision they come with. >> you think it would tips the balance at this point? >> what i would support as the united states making a move to form a relationship with carefully vetted rebel groups. i think the united states has come to the conclusion armed people on the ground are going to be dictating a series of's future -- dictating syria's future. it could include training, tactical intelligence, non- legal the equipment. i think it is essential if the ignited states do -- if the united states wants to exert influence. >> do you think they are in danger of not exerting influence? >> i think the president of the united states has certain reservations about gett
, but why is it causing the u.s. stock market to dive? welcome to our viewers on public at telik -- public television in america and also around the globe. britain most -- britain's most senior catholic has thrust the succession plans into question. cardinal keith o'brien has stepped down after being accused of inappropriate behavior with priests. he was due to take part in the conclave to elect the successor to pope benedict, but will now not be going to rome. our religious correspondent has the details. >> for a decade and more, he has been one of scotland's biggest personalities and strongest voices. then came allegations that cardinal o'brien behaved inappropriately towards four priests in his care during the 1980's. suddenly, he is out of office. today, cardinal o'brien stayed behind closed doors. in a statement, he acknowledged his poor health, but made no attempt to rebut the allegations against him. instead he said, for any good i have been able to do, i thank god. for any failures, i apologize to him all whom i have asked to all whom i have -- i apologize to all whom i have offend
. >> as iran struggles with its uncertain future, here in the u.s., there is a dose of economic tug-of-war. right now, the two political parties are deadlocked over how cuts knowne spending as the sequester that will go into effect on friday. today, president obama was in newport news, va. stressing his case. here is the report. >> along virginia coastline, it seems almost everyone works for the military in one way or another and with a sense of dread about the future. all the ships come to this yard to be refitted and repaired. but the navy has worn them that the looming cuts mean work will be cancelled on 13 ships. three --ny has told 3500 workers they could be laid off. it is a story that could be repeated all over america. >> it could affect a lot of people. not just shipyard people. wohlschlegel down to everybody. the uniformed people -- it will trickle down to everybody. the uniformed people. the diners down the street. it could put this country in the worst depression since the '20s. >> it takes a lot to>> it couldf scare the military, but they seem rattled by the proposed cu
in the u.s. engaged in quantitative easing. not a lot of people will accuse japan at this stage. he has room for abenomics. he has a 71% support rate with confidence in the community. but if he doesn't restructure -- it will probably run out of steam. >> to what extent is the meeting tomorrow between obama and abe a meeting about china? >> even the japanese economy is about china. the american economy relies on them for the military and -- to maintain a stable balance of power in action -- they are concerned of a change in power. chinese growth makes the japanese economy important. and they will talk about china. >> they have to have japan act -- the second and third largest economies in china and japan, and japan is the counterbalance. >> the u.s. doesn't have the ability to stop china's growth, and will the major economies have the clout to write the rules and set the norms that make sure china's rise is useful. >> we could be talking ofut the security concerns china and japan. this is almost the same, keeping a check on the rising china. >> containing china is not in our means. there
to a busy start this year as corporate america is feeling the urge to merge. from the american airlines-u.s. airways deal to warren buffet's ketchup acquisition, multibillion-dollar marriages are fast and furious. there's even an office romance brewing between office depot and office max. all the pairing can be good for shareholders of the acquired firms, not to mention investment bankers, but what does it mean for the broader stock market? floor broker doreen mogavero says it's definitely a vote of confidence for the stock market, but she worries about long-term ramifications for the economy. >> i'm not so sure how much consolidation is actually good because that to me actually means job losses at the administrative level, factory level and even c.e.o. level. so-- i'm not that worried about the c.e.o.s, but still. >> reporter: this year, as m&a activity heats up, stocks have resisted a much talked about correction. the dow, s&p 500 and nasdaq are all up a healthy amount. investment pro sam stovall says if the majority of deals are cash, as many have been in 2013, it suggests the m&a cycle
's calling on congress to pass legislation to give the u.s. government the capacity it needs to secure our networks. the president also issued an executive order, to create cyber security standards for u.s. businesses, and for the government to share more information about threats. but cyber security experts, say while that sounds easy, it's hard to do. >> you can't just inform one party necessarily, you might really have an obligation as a government to inform every player in a sector, and then of course that's a high bar, because you're sharing the information with a lot of people which increases the likelihood that it might get out back into the wrong hands. >> susie: beckstrom says the threat of cyber attack or manipulation to critical infrastructure like the power grid and transportation systems is much worse than most people expect. from the "ramones" to the "clash," still ahead, investing in punk rock history, and the prices might surprise you. after the closing bell on wall street today, record revenues for cisco systems: $12.1 billion. that gave the networking equipment maker earn
on the monster storm from bernie rayno of accuweather. >> woodruff: then, should the u.s. arm the rebels in syria? ray suarez examines a growing rift between the white house and key members of the president's cabinet. >> brown: spencer michels has the story of new discoveries about mars coming from the rover vehicle known as "curiosity," the product of nasa's jet propulsion lab. >> it may sound familiar but what scientists here at jpl are actually looking for are signs of life past and present on the red planet >> woodruff: mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with pulitzer- prize-winning humorist dave barry about miami, the "insane city" that's the focus of his new novel. >> the people come from everywhere, people just weird people are attracted to miami. the wildlife is weird, the weather is weird, it's a festering stew of weirdness. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: bnsf railway. >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation cre
the cuts could harm the u.s. military and civilian defense workers. >> woodruff: to help us better understand the underlying political strategy being used at the white house and on capitol hill, we turn to two journalists closely following the developments. jonathan weisman of the "new york times" covers congress, and margaret talev covers the white house for bloomberg news. we welcome you both to the newshour. margaret, to you first. for days the white house has been raising the specter of terrible things that are going to happen. slowing air travel, people being laid off their jobs. furl owes. border security. problems. now that they see the republicans aren't moving, what do they think about this approach? >> they think it's a very good political approach. they will continue to use it right up until march 1. the white house has been prepared for march 1 to come and go and nothing to happen in the sequester to take effect. a part of what they're doing is a campaign to pressure republicans to get them to act but they're campaigning to position themselves as the ones trying to get
laws in the u.s. >> nothing really truly equalizes a small petite woman with someone who's 6'3, 230 pounds who's angry except a firearm. >> those weapons often times fall in the hands of bad folks in our communities. >> suarez: hari sreenivasan brings together high school students from across the country to talk about guns and violence. >> woodruff: and as oscar night nears, tony scott, movie critic for the "new york times," gives us his take on the latest buzz about wild cards and front runners. that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: there may be hope yet
there is a safety problem. the eating of horse meat is quite a taboo. a member of the u.s. commerce community faces a long prison sentence for his role in a series of attacks in which victims hair and beards were forcibly cut off -- a member of the u.s. amish community. he and 15 members of his breakaway group were found guilty of five hate crimes in the american state of ohio. heavy snowfall started in the northeast of the united states. it is the beginning of what is predicted to be a massive, even historic, a blizzard. people have been stocking up on food and other supplies ahead of the storm, which is poised to dump up to a meter of snow from new york city to boston and beyond. the parents of a teenage girl shot dead days after appearing at president obama's inauguration have told the bbc that american gun laws have to change. 15-year-old hadiya pendleton was killed in a park on chicago's south side in what police believe was a case of mistaken identity. michelle obama will attend her funeral tomorrow. despite the soul-searching in america following the sandy hook shooting, january was the dead
the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop. if they are to survive. it's one of two american institutions in the news tonight for differing reasons in changing times. we want to begin tonight with nbc's tom costello in glen echo, maryland. tom, good evening. >> reporter: hi, brian, no secret the postal service is up to its neck in red ink, handling 30 billion fewer pieces of first class mail today than just four years ago. and guess what? delivery of packages booming because we're all buying stuff online. this action is about just trying to keep the lights on. for people all over america, like 71-year-old lois sexton in tennessee, that mailbox at the end of the driveway has been a reliable connection to the rest of the world. >> that's my communication with the people i have my retirement with, my social security. >> reporter: since 1863, six days a week, rain or shine, letters, bills, government checks, newspapers, even movies, have arrived, even on saturday. now the 21st century with its e-mail, e-cards and e-pay, has come knocking. >> we cannot put ou
its easy efforts to stimulate the economy had u.s. markets seeing green. the dow gained 116, the nasdaq is up 13, and the s&p rose nine. washington bureau chief darren gersh has details on the fed chairman's strong defense of his aggressive policy to support the economy. >> reporter: sure, there are risks when the federal reserve is buying almost $3 billion worth of bonds every day. but chairman ben bernanke told congress basically, "we got this." >> although a long period of low rates could encourage excessive risk taking, and continued close attention to such developments is certainly warranted, to this point, we do not see potential costs to the increased risk- taking in some financial markets is outweighing the benefits of promoting a stronger economic recovery and more rapid job creation. >> reporter: with unemployment stuck around 8% and inflation subdued at 1.5%, there are no economic red lights flashing. so bernanke gave no signals he was ready to change course or back away from his aggressive program to get the economy back to a more normal level of output. still, t
less an and the future of the church, we're joined by monsignor rick hilgartner of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops. he's the executive director of the secretariat of divine worship. sister christine schenk, a catholic nun and executive director of future church, which calls for a more progressive church. and from rome, john allen of cnn. he covers the vatican for the network and for the "national catholic reporter." we thank you all three for being with us. john allen, i'm going to stay with you. how much of a surprise was this? >> judy, i think this was a near total shock. just to tell you how crazy it was, i was actually scheduled to have lunch with a senior vatican official, a guy who works just down the hall from the papal apartment. as of early this morning even he didn't know it was coming. as your set-up piece indicated the shock isn't the content of the decision -- benedict had hinted fairly openly that he was receptive to the idea of a pope resigning, that actually under some circumstances a pope would have an obligation to resign if he's not able to continue to perfor
before the march first deadline. for more on the sequestration and what it means for the u.s. military. i'm joined by deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. welcome, mr. secretary so let's just pick up with that comment from some republicans that this is exaggerated. >> well, for us in the defense department, unfortunately, it's not exaggerated. in fact, we don't want to take any of these steps. we certainly are trying to do it in the way that does the minimum damage to national security. we don't have a lot of flexibility, and we don't have a lot of time in that regard. sequester requires us to find $46 billion in the last half of the year, and then we have an additional problem with the lack of an appropriations bill, which is a particular problem for us. you put those two things together, and in some of accounts that fund training, for example, for army units, those accounts are 30% short over the year, and now we only have half the year in which to make up those savings. what that means is we're going to protect the wars in afghanistan-- we've got to nund them. we have to fund-- n
. in europe and possibly japan in the u.s. these animals can go for many tens of thousands of dollars. >> rose: now the plow share tortoise was once thought to be extinct? >> it was once thought to be extinct as are the case with many species of turtles and tortoises. >> rose: then they find something that says "no, they're not all gone." >> they were rediscovered in 1971 but prior to '97 71 only a handful had reached the western world. the species e.e.g. i don't gofy had been contracted to a tiny range and a remote part of madagascar so it was unclear if there were any left. so >> so if you had unlimited resources-- and you may as far as i know-- >> i don't, trust me. >> rose: if you had more money could you do more? >> absolutely, sure. when you choose to protect a species it's almost like going into a war. you have to choose your battles and you have to figure out -- it's a horrible thing to say but you have to figure out where can you make a measurable difference? in the case of the plow share tortoise i thought i could make a difference. i thought the range was so small i could get my arm
life in prison. in economic news, output at u.s. auto plants fell in january, and that pushed overall manufacturing down after two months of gains. and on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average gained eight points to close at 13,981. the nasdaq fell six points to close at 3,192. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq dropped a tenth of a percent. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: president obama wrapped up his post-state of the union tour with a visit to his hometown today. margaret warner has the story. >> warner: the president's trip to chicago came amid the country's new focus on gun violence. and while he was there to talk about raising the minimum wage and expanding preschool for children, the city's surge of gun killings wasn't far from his mind. >> last year, there were 443 murders with a firearm on the streets of this city, and 65 of those victims were 18 and under. so that's the equivalent of a newtown every four months. and that's precisely why the overwhelming majority of americans are asking for some common-sense pro
. there are 1.5 million registered 501(c)3 charities in the u.s., but finding those that have the biggest impact in the communities they serve isn't easy. large charitable foundations, much like institutional investors, do their own research, but its more challenging for individual donors. the global philanthropy network started the social impact exchange, a group made up of non-profit organizations and non-profit experts. they came up with something similar to a stock index called the s&i index, for "social" and "impact." only, instead of publicly traded stocks, it's made up of the top charities in the country with a proven track record. the doe fund is one of those. >> if we couldn't measure it, it wasn't worth doing for us. >> reporter: at s&i100.org, donors can search organizations in their communities, review growth plans and program metrics. >> if you really want to have confidence that you're going to help a child learn to read or move a single mom out of poverty or graduate kids from the toughest neighborhoods of high school, these are the organizations that have proof that they're doing
in the u.s., but if you use an apple iphone, hewlett packard computer or any of dozens of other electronic devices, foxconn is the taiwanese company that assembles it. today foxconn said it has frozen the hiring of assembly-line workers in china after the lunar holiday there. that fed speculation about demand from apple and h.p. apple shares fell 2.2% since the plant freezing hiring makes the iphone five, but foxconn said its decision to stop hiring was not related to making the iphone. an analyst at investment bank u.b.s. thinks it could be because of less demand for hewlett packard desktop computers. h.p.q. shares were down by 1.1%. hewlett-packard reports its latest quarterly earnings tomorrow after the closing bell. independent energy companies devon and anadarko updated their shareholders on their strategies, but both were greeted with selling. anadarko petroleum was down 4.5%. it's energy production outlook was less than expected while it's forecast for capital spending was more than anticipated. it expects to be among the most active deepwater drillers this year. devon energy fell 6
. number one, we are one of the largest natural organic food and personal care companies in the u.s. and the world. our last nielsen numbers that came out, you know, we're growing at 10% on retail stores. you know, in our quarter last night, our growth was up 25%, organic growth is up 9.4% in the u.s. we had hurricane sandy in there, stores were closed for a week. our margins improved dramatically. 72 -- >> at a time when everyone else in the food business is telling me that food costs went up. >> food costs went up. we earned 72 cents. our earnings per share were up 55%. so i guess what else can we do to make our shareholders happy? and i think our long shareholders will be happy. the barron's article, hey, when you come back -- >> i had to bring it up. >> sure. >> it hammered the stock. >> is there trouble in tea land? of course there's not trouble in tea land. is there going to be competition coming after us? absolutely, and i've said this before, indra nooyi, she's doing a great thing. >> pepsico. >> to bring more healthier foods. i can't change the way the world eats, you know,
decision making in the u.s. house. >> a lot of conservatives are outraged by this... >> there was a fundamental dismantling here in washington of the tea party movement. i think they viewed the tea party movement as something that scared them. today what you see is, "now that we've broken you up, now you're going to do it my way." >> leadership gets rid of challenges... >> narrator: and with the election over, the deadline for the fiscal cliff was less than two months away. boehner made the first move. >> they wanted to get a card out there and put it down quickly. so they prepared a speech and went through 18 drafts. it was tinkered with right there on the teleprompter up until the final moments. >> house speaker john boehner is going to be speaking to reporters. his office says he wants to talk about the fiscal cliff... >> mr. president, this is your moment. we're ready to be led, not as democrats or republicans, but as americans. >> the speaker came out and acknowledged that the president won. elections have consequences, and he acknowledged that right away. and
's nothing on earth more mobile than capital and capital income. and the u.s. is a relatively high capital income tax country. we have about the highest corporate tax on earth. i think guiana and the congo have higher rates. other than that, nobody does. so if we try to drive up the amount of revenue we extract from capital the capital flees and there are no jobs in the u.s. so we have to have a more 21st century appreciation for how economies really work. and if we want to create high-paying jobs for people we need to create an environment that's friendly to firms to create jobs. >> the tax burden -- i was going to say, the tax burden on corporation is the lowest it's been in decades. >> because they're locating the jobs overseas. that's how the curve works. >> 11 european union commissioners, including the conservative finance minister of germany has signed on to the financial transaction tax. i think you're seeing an understanding of a 21st century economy and how it treats capital. not in this country, not from the republicans. but if i could just say one important thing. last night, t
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